Vintage Esquire Illustrations: Alpha to ? ? ?

Flanderian

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⇧ Fantastic stuff. In fifth pic down, Gable's vest and jacket clash a bit, IMHO. Outfit still looks good overall, just wouldn't pair that jacket and vest as my first choice.

And Gary Cooper, third down, might actually be a real-life instantiation of the Apparel Arts measurements and "square jaw-ness."
Yes, Cooper was quite the coat rack!

These are from Esquire May '34 -
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To be continued:
 

Fading Fast

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On paper, I wouldn't have gone with the white-collar shirt with a white three-piece suit, but darn it, it works.
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Flanderian

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On paper, I wouldn't have gone with the white-collar shirt with a white three-piece suit, but darn it, it works.
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When it's your yacht, everything works! :icon_cheers:

But truly, that's one of the things I enjoy most about these illustrations. Text not-with-standing, it seems likely to me that many of the choices in the ensembles we see painted are products of the illustrators' talent and taste, and in the case of several, they're quite exceptional. So for me, it offers both insight and instruction of the possibilities for putting one's self together. There's little to be lost by experimenting, but a world to gain.

Why be dull?
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Bonus ads -

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This concludes Esquire, May 1934.
 

Cowtown

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The Churchwell brothers have incredible style and look like they could have been featured in the vintage Esquire issues.
 

Flanderian

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The Churchwell brothers have incredible style and look like they could have been featured in the vintage Esquire issues.
And as distinguished professionally, as sartorially! Dr. Andre remains at home with Vanderbilt, while Dr. Keith was purloined by Yale.

Perhaps when they retire, they'd consider doing America a favor and underwrite a haberdashery dedicated to their style! :cool:


Edit: And I've got the name; Chruchwell's! Couldn't beat it with a stick! :D
 

Flanderian

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These are from Esquire June '34 -

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To be continued:
 

Fading Fast

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⇧ Really interesting text with this one as it discusses the merger of Town and Country. Also, noting that the sweater is "short waisted," I assume the writer is conveying that when using a sweater to replace a traditional suit vest, a short-waisted one is better as it more closely mimics the suit's vest's look.

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And another guy with a 16" drop from his 48" chest to his 32" waist all on his 6'8" frame - these guy were a dime a dozen in the '30s (in the pages of Apparel Arts and Esquire).

My dad was born in '24, was 6'4" and a 50L with a 40"-46" waist (depending on where in his weight gain/loss cycle he was) and he was an absolute giant for his day based on all the pictures I've seen and what I know of average heights and sizes from that period.
 

Flanderian

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View attachment 24988
⇧ Really interesting text with this one as it discusses the merger of Town and Country. Also, noting that the sweater is "short waisted," I assume the writer is conveying that when using a sweater to replace a traditional suit vest, a short-waisted one is better as it more closely mimics the suit's vest's look.

View attachment 24989

And another guy with a 16" drop from his 48" chest to his 32" waist all on his 6'8" frame - these guy were a dime a dozen in the '30s (in the pages of Apparel Arts and Esquire).

My dad was born in '24, was 6'4" and a 50L with a 40"-46" waist (depending on where in his weight gain/loss cycle he was) and he was an absolute giant for his day based on all the pictures I've seen and what I know of average heights and sizes from that period.
Part of the appearance of the sweater's length is the deliberate distortion of height we've been discussing, but in general sweaters were worn shorter, and snugger than is now common. And waist length sweaters also tended to be knit with wider ribbing at the waist, which is something I'd like to see more of as I think it's more flattering.

The wild physiques we see depicted are unrealistic, either then or now. But I have to think some of it was also an attempt by the illustrators to depict the shoulder enhancing, and waist diminishing properties of that cut.

Certainly your dad was a very big man for the era. When I came along in the late '40's and grew to a full adult height of 5'10", that was average. But with guys getting bigger, and mother nature's revenge, I'm now a shrimp! :eek: